Monthly Archives: July 2011

Magazines at UbuWeb

UbuWeb is a really amazing resource for anyone interested in 20th-century art and culture. It’s also got some interesting material for those interested in magazines.

You can look at  volumes 1-3 of the really important Dutch magazine De Stijl  in pdf format.  They’re surprisingly plain and text-heavy, but I was stuck by the presence of ads in some issues.

Then there’s the incomparable Aspen magazine–the experimental magazine that ran from 1965-71, not the one for vacationers.  I don’t want to spoil the surprise too much if you’re not familiar with it, but it’s pretty fascinating in the ways it with format and design. And what a roster!:  Warhol, Beckett, Cage, LeWitt, Sontag, Barthes, Reich, Ballard, Richter, McLuhan, and many, many more of the artists, writers, and thinkers who defined the 60s and 70s.  I’ll just say it’s well worth a look.

Finally, UBUWEB aslo has the first 3 issues of Dada magazine, edited by Tristan Tzara.

Advertisements

Victorian Periodical Networks

The latest issue of the Victorian Periodicals Review is just out and available through Project:MUSE.  It’s a special issue on networks (so I’m excited).  Table of Contents after the jump. Continue reading

The American Essay and the American Magazine

Magazine Modernisms is happy to announce the publication of Ned Stuckey-French’s The American Essay in the American Century, which will be of real interest to those interested in two burgeoning fields of study:  American periodical culture and middlebrow taste.  The book recounts the history of the personal essay in the twentieth century, a history that largely took shape in magazines among writers trying to find a new form, suitable for cosmopolitan middle-class readers, for the essay. Readers of this blog will also want to visit the small but illuminating digital archive Stuckey-French has created at his website.  The “Essays in America” archive provides bibliographic and contextual information and images for some classic American essays, originally published in periodicals, by Martin Luther King, H. L. Mencken, Margaret Sanger and others. Read the publisher’s description after the jump. Continue reading

Egoist and New Freewoman free for all

The Modernist Journals Project has done modernist studies a great service (again!) by putting up the complete run of The Freewoman, The New Freewoman, and The Egoist.  There’s few sources that give as fine a view on the multi-branched development of Anglo-American modernism in the teens.

New Issue of American Periodicals Released

Volume 21.2 of American Periodicals is now available through Project Muse.  Table of Contents after the jump. Continue reading

Vintage Magazines

As I was preparing for my class on modernism and travel this summer I came across a website of vintage travel magazines that might be of interest. These magazines range from the The Sailors’ Magazine and Seamen’s Friend (September 1893)

to Harper’s Magazine (January 1888)

There is also a selection of National Geographics, turn-of-the-century women’s magazines, and The Literary Digest.

Enjoy!