Table of Contents of Oxford History of Modernist Magazines Vol 2: North America

For those of you with $228.27 to spare, the new volume of the Oxford Critical and Cultural History of Modernist Magazines Vol 2: North America 1894-1960 has been published.  Table of Contents after the jump.
Orientations
1. Poetry: a Magazine of Verse (1912-36), ‘biggest of little magazines’ , Helen Carr
2. The Little Review (1914-29) , Alan Golding
3. The Dial (1920-9) , Christina Britzolakis
4. The Crisis (1910-34) , Rachel Farebrother
Precursors, Mainstream, and Margins
5. ‘Ephemeral Bibelots’ in the 1890s , Brad Evans
6. The Chap-Book (1894-8) , Giles Bergel
7. Modernism and the Quality Magazines: Vanity Fair (1914-36); American Mercury (1924- ); New Yorker (1925- ); Esquire (1933 – ) , Faye Hammill and Karen Leick
8. Pulp Magazines and the Popular Press , David Earle
An American Art
9. American Manners: The Smart Set (1900-29); American Parade (1926) , Sharon Hamilton
10. In the American Grain: Contact (1920-3; 1932) and Pagany. A Native Quarterly (1930-3) , Eric White
11. Through an American Lens: Camera Work (1903-17) and 291 (1915-6); Manuscripts , Caroline Blinden
The Free Verse Controversy
12. The New Poetry: Glebe (1913-14), Others (1915-19); The Poetry Review of America (1916-17) , Suzanne W. Churchill and Ethan Jaffee
13. Poetry in Perspective: the Melange of the 1920s: The Measure (1921-26), Rhythmus (1923-4), and Palms (1923-30) , Andrew Thacker
14. Into the 1930s: ound & Horn (1927-34) Troubadour (1928-32), Blues (1929-30), Smoke (1931-37), and Furioso (1939-53) , Alex Howard
Drama and the Critical Arts
15. A New Theatre: Theatre Arts Magazine (1916-64); Drama (1911-31) , Dorothy Chansky and Terry Brino-Dean
16. ‘Audacious Modernity’: The Seven Arts (1916-17), The Soil (1916-17), and The Trend (1911-15) , Victoria Kingham
17. Hound & Horn (1927-34) , Michael Faherty
Part II The Metropolis, Regionalism, Canada, and Europe
Greenwich Village
18. Bruno’s Bohemia: Greenwich Village (1915); Bruno’s Chap Books (1915-16); Bruno’s Weekly (1915-16); Bruno’s (1917); Bruno’s Bohemia (1918); Bruno’s Review (1919); Bruno’s Review of Two Worlds (1920-22) , Stephen Rogers
19. The Avant-Garde in the Village: Rogue (1915) , Deborah Longworth
20. Village Voices: The Ink-Pot (1916); Open Vistas (1925); The New Cow (1927); The Village Magazine (1910, 1920, 1925); The Greenwich Villager (1921-2; 33-4) , Stephen Rogers
The South and West
21. Fugitive Voices: The Reviewer (1921-25); The Lyric (1921- ); The Fugitive (1922-5) , Michael Kreyling
22. Negotiating the Margins of the American South: The Double Dealer (1921-9) , Craig Monk
23. The Call of the Southwest: The Texas Review (1915-24), Southwest Review (1924-), and The Morada (1929-30) , Mark S. Morrisson
24. Middling Modernism and the Midwestern Little Magazine: The Midland (1915-33) and Prairie Schooner (1927-) , Jeffrey C. Swenson
25. ‘Our Own Authentic Wonderland’: The Modernist Geographical Imagination and ‘Little Magazines’ of the American West: Laughing Horse (1921-39), Westward (1927-34), Troubadour (1928-32), Gyroscope (1929-30), New Mexico Quarterly (1931-69), and Intermountain Review (1937-65) , Sarah A. Fedirka
Canada
26. ‘Little magazines’ in English Canada , Dean Irvine
Cross-Currents: America and Europe
27. Destinations: Broom (1921-4) and Secession (1922-4) , Peter Nicholls
28. ‘Growth through disagreement’: S4N (1919-25) , Peter Brooker
29. Between Worlds: Gargoyle (1921-2); This Quarter (1925-32); and Tambour (1929-1930) , Gregory Baptista
30. Exiles: the transatlantic review (1924-5) and The Exile (1927-8) , Andrzej Gasiorek
31. Between Modernisms: transition (1927-1938) , Celine Mansanti
32. Critics Abroad: The Early Years of The Paris Review (1953-65) , Christopher Bains
33. Europe in America: Remapping Broken Cultural Lines: View (1940-7) and VVV (1942-4) , Stamatina Dimakopoulou
Part III The Radical Decades
The Harlem Renaissance
34. Organisational Voices: The Messenger (1917-28) and Opportunity (1923-49) , George Hutchinson
35. ‘Devoted to younger negro artists’: Fire!! (1926) and Harlem (1928) , Martha Nadell
A Revolutionary Message
36. The Masses Speak: The Masses (1911-17); The Liberator (1918-24); New Masses (1926-48); and Masses & Mainstream (1948-63) , Benoit Tadie
37. The Left in the Twenties: Good Morning (1919-22), The Freeman (1920-4), The Modern Quarterly (1923-9) , Peter Marks
38. The Left in the Thirties: The Modern Quarterly (1929-33; became The Modern Monthly, 1933-40), Blast: A Magazine of Proletarian Short Stories (1933-4), and The Windsor Quarterly (1933-5) , Peter Marks
39. Rebel Poets and Critics: The Rebel Poet (1931-2), The Anvil (1933-5), Dynamo (1934-5), and Partisan Review (1934-2003) , Michael Rozendal
The Critical 1940s
40. New Criticism’s Major Journals: The Southern Review (1935-42); The Kenyon Review (1939-70); and The Sewanee Review (1892- ) , John N. Duvall
41. Academic Magazines: The Morningside (1815-1932); Yale Review (1819- ); The Columbia Review (1932- ); The Wake (1944-6; 1948-53); Chicago Review (1946- ); The Georgia Review (1947- ), Epoch (1947- ); The Beloit Poetry Journal (1950-); TriQuarterly (1958-); and The Big Table (1959-60) , Tim Woods
In the Modernist Grain
42. Black Mountain and Associates: Origin (1951-2007) and The Black Mountain Review (1954-7) , Tim Woods
43. New York Poets: Folder (1953-6); Neon (1956-60); and Yugen (1958-62) , Ian Patterson
44. ‘little… only with some qualification’: the Beats and Beat ‘little magazines’: Neurotica (1948-52); The Ark (1947); Ark II Moby I (1956); Ark III (1957); Black Mountain Review (1957); Evergreen Review (1957-9); Chicago Review (1958); Big Table (1959-65); Kulchur (1960-5); and Yugen (1958-62) , R. J. Ellis
Select Bibliography
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